The Catholic University of America

"Merged Identities: Native Americans and African Americans in the Chesapeake"

 Eighth Annual Regina Flannery Herzfeld Symposium
on the Cultural Heritage of Native Americans

 

Gabrielle Tayac

Native peoples of the Chesapeake region were among the first devastated by European pandemics, colonial warfare, land loss, impoverishment, and cultural assimilation beginning more than a hundred years prior to the foundation of the United States.  A key distinction for Chesapeake communities has been the profound interactions with African Americans and the effects of race laws.  This lecture will explore how the main surviving Native peoples in the local region - the Piscataway, Powhatan, and Nanticoke - have transformed their identities over time through relationships with African Americans and as a consequence of racism.

Gabrielle Tayac is herself Piscataway, has worked as an historian at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian since receiving her PhD at Harvard in 1999, and before that was a Ralph Bunche Human Rights Fellow with Amnesty International, where she created several American Indian outreach groups, including the Indigenous Peoples’ Urgent Action Network, and provided as human rights assistance for cases in Central and South America.  At the NMAI, she has curated exhibits on The Native Landscape, on Algonquian peoples of the Chesapeake, on relations of African-American and Native Americans in the Americas, and published IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas (Smithsonian Books, 2009) and Meet Naiche: A Native Boy from the Chesapeake Bay Area (2007) in the Museum's Young Native Americans Series.  

 

March 31, 2016 @ 4 pm
Location: Pryzbyla Center Great Room A

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

Reception to Follow

 

To RSVP or for accommodations information, email to cua-anthro@cua.edu

 

 

 

"Rethinking the Records: From Pioneering Women Anthropologists to Contemporary Native American Women"

Seventh Annual Regina Flannery Herzfeld Symposium
on the Cultural Heritage of Native Americans

 

Gwyneira Isaac

From the start of anthropology as a professional endeavor in the 19th century, a handful of women undertook intensive fieldwork to provide a detailed record of Native American ways of life. Few received recognition during their lifetime, yet their work resulted in a vast collection of photographs and sound recordings, which provide opportunity to rethink both their contributions to the discipline and Native American studies. Here, I look at Matilda Coxe Stevenson, who was the first woman to work for the Bureau of American Ethnology and to conduct fieldwork in the Southwest region of the United States. Her legacy of close to a thousand photographs, now housed at the National Anthropological Archives, provides a rare glimpse into life in the Pueblos in the late 19th century, as well as experimental approaches to the camera. I also discuss current collaborative work on the Southwest ethnographic collections at the National Museum of Natural History through partnership with women potters from Hopi, which redresses the historic focus on men’s knowledge and religious societies and enables women to become active partners in the research and presentation of their cultures. 

Dr. Isaac (D.Phil. Oxford) is Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution).  Her specialties are knowledge systems and the relationships societies develop with their past, especially as expressed through material culture and museums. She has done fieldwork on the development of a tribal museum in the Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, where she examined the difficulties faced by Zunis operating between Zuni and Euro-American epistemologies both within their own constituencies and cross-culturally (Mediating Knowledges: Origins of a Museum for the Zuni People, 2007).  She has also explored reproductions of knowledge in replicas and models ('Whose Idea Was This? Replicas, Museums and the Reproduction of Knowledge' in Current Anthropology, 2011) and, at the Smithsonian, is a collaborator on the Recovering Voices initiative, developing methods for applied synthesis of research to understand  and integrate the production of new knowledge within interdisciplinary research on endangered languages.  She is also working on building a collaborative with communities, scholars and institutions in the Southwest with interests in exploring knowledge and language sustainability. 

 

 March 18, 2015 @ 4 pm
Location: PRYZ 321-323

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

Reception to Follow

 

To RSVP or for accommodations information, email to cua-anthro@cua.edu

 

 

"Breaking Ground in the 1930s: The First Female Native American Archaeologist"

Sixth Annual Regina Flannery Herzfeld Symposium
on the Cultural Heritage of Native Americans

 

Margaret M. Bruchac

Bertha Yewas Parker (1907-1978), the first professional female Native American archaeologist, was raised among urban Indians in New York City,gained national recognition for her discoveries at the Gypsum Cave site and was employed as an archaeologist and ethnologist by the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles, where she worked with the Los Angeles urban Indian community.

 

Dr. Margaret M. Bruchac (Abenaki) is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Coordinator of the Native American Studies Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research on Bertha Parker was supported by a 2011-2012 Ford Fellowship and by the Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research. From 2008-2012, Bruchac was an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Coordinator of Native American and Indigenous Studies at the University of Connecticut; from 2003-2010, she served as the Five College Repatriation Research Liaison. Her publications include Dreaming Again: Algonkian Poetry (Bowman Books 2012), Indigenous Archaeologies: A Reader in Decolonization (Left Coast Press 2010), and articles in Anthropology News, the Historical Journal of Massachusetts and Museum Anthropology, among others. Her new book---titled Consorting With Savages: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists---is forthcoming from the University of Arizona Press.

 

 April 9, 2014 @ 3 pm
Great Room A at Pryzbyla Center

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

Reception to Follow

To RSVP or for accommodations information, email to cua-anthro@cua.edu

 

 

 

"Decolonizing Archaeology: Community-based Research in Indigenous and Local Communities"

Fifth Annual Regina Flannery Herzfeld Symposium
on the Cultural Heritage of Native Americans

 

Sonya Atalay

Dr. Atalay received her PhD in 2003 from UC-Berkeley and has taught at Indiana University and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she joined the faculty in 2012 as Assistant Professor of Anthropology.  From 2009 to 2011, she worked with the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe on intellectual property in cultural heritage; her book, Community-Based Archaeology: Research with, by and for Indigenous and Local Communities, was published by the University of California Press in 2012.  In discussing the principles of community-based participatory research that she has applied in five collaborative projects in Turkey and Native North America, Dr. Atalay will consider the challenges, benefits, and ethical dilemmas involved in planning and carrying out anthropological research using a community-based approach.

 

March 13, 2013 @  3 pm
Happel Room in Caldwell Hall

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

Reception to Follow

To RSVP or for accommodations information, email to cua-anthro@cua.edu

 

 

"Recognized, Non-recognized or Inter-Tribal: Conflicts in Indian Identity Politics"


Fourth Annual Regina Flannery Herzfeld Symposium
on the Cultural Heritage of Native Americans


Joe Watkins
 

Director of the Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma, and Adjunct Associate Professor in the University's Department of Anthropology. He received his PhD in archaeology from Southern Methodist University, was the Choctaw Nation's tribal archaeologist (2002-09) and now serves on the Nation's Repatriation Committee.  His research interests include the ethical practice of anthropology and disciplinary relationships with descendant communities and Aboriginal populations. 

Author of Indigenous Archaeology: American Indian Values and Scientific Practice (2000)  Reclaiming Physical Heritage: Repatriation and Sacred Sites (2005), and contributor to Cross Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States (2006), Kennewick Man: Perspectives on the Ancient One (2008).

March 21, 2012 @ 3 pm
Pryzbyla Center 321-323


with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

Reception to Follow

To RSVP or for accommodations information, email to cua-anthro@cua.edu



"The Women's Side: Studying Gender among Native Americans"

 Third Annual Regina Flannery Herzfeld Symposium
on the Cultural Heritage of Native Americans

Loretta Fowler

Ethnohistorical consultant at the Newberry Library on an Indians of the Midwest project, D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History in Chicago, and Professor Emerita at the University of Oklahoma, Norman.  

Author of Arapahoe Politics; Symbols of Crisis and Authority 1851-1878 (1982), Shared Symbols, Contested Meanings; Gros Ventre Culture and History, 1778-1984 (1987), Tribal Sovereignty and the Historical Imagination: Cheyenne-Arapaho Politics (2002), and the Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains (2003).  Her most recent book is  Wives and Husbands: Gender and Age in Southern Arapaho History (University of Oklahoma Press, 2010). 

 

April 29, 2011 @ 5 pm
Steven Happel Room in Caldwell Hall

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

  Reception to follow.

 

 

"Keepers of the Past,Curators of the Future"

A Symposium on New Directions in Managing Native American Cultural Heritage 
in honor of Regina Flannery Herzfeld

featuring

Kevin Gover, Director
National Museum of the American Indian

Stephen Loring, Arctic Program
Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History

Margaret MacLean, Senior Analyst
Cultural Heritage Center, US Department of State

Followed by Luncheon

 

April 22, 2010 9:30 am - 1 pm

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund

To RSVP or for accommodations information, email to cua-anthro@cua.edu

 

 

"Their Hearts Were Strong"

Anthropological Field Records and the Preservation of Traditional Knowledge, Cultural and Historical Continuity 

A Symposium in Honor of Regina Flannery Herzfeld

featuring

Stan Louttit, Moose Cree First Nation, Canada
William "Snuffy" Main, Gros Ventre Tribe, Montana
Toby Morantz, McGill University
Orin Hatton, Ethnomusicologist

Followed by Reception

April 24, 2009 9:30 am - 2:30 pm

Caldwell Auditorium

with support from the Regina F. Herzfeld Memorial Fund